All personal photos are copyrighted. Unauthorized use of them is prohibited. Please contact simonmorley@outlook.com for any further information.

Saturday, 7 June 2014

Super predator Pt.2

The smart folks in white coats think they may have the answer to what ate the 3 metre great white from the previous blog entry.

The scientists claim their new data matched all of the tracking information from the disappeared shark: The body temperature they registered was the same and the size of the cannibal great white shark—which they estimated to be 16 foot long and weigh over 2 tons—could easily pull off the same speed and trajectory captured in the tracking device.

It makes sense: The only thing that could reasonably eat a shark is something that resembles a shark, only bigger. The bigger the shark, the bigger the bully. The studies show how smaller sharks immediately vacate the waters when they sense a giant one is nearby. Well, that and krakens and kaijus and secret weaponized alien megalodons.

As for why a larger shark would cannibalize a smaller shark, the study suggested theories about how it could have been attacked. Maybe it was a territorial dispute. Perhaps even a hunger induced attack. Finally it settled on a hypothesis that makes the most sense: Big sharks eat little sharks.