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Tuesday, 1 November 2016

Rocky Paths

It's that time of the year again where we get the inconsistent winter weather and rotating winds that make getting in the water a bit of a crap shoot. We packed our gear and headed up to LHP where it wasn't too bad but we knew it would be picking up as the morning went on, so we made the most of it.

As usual with a lot of dives here, it was all about the macro life and trying to get some half decent shots of small stuff in really awkward positions. I swear they do it on purpose.




A little bit of a Northerly current meant we had to keep our heads down and hop from coral head to coral head to keep out of the worst of it. But we still managed to see a nice selection of shrimp, blennies, gobies and nimble spray crabs braving the elements.



There was also a nice little juvenile bridled burrfish that was hanging around for a little while with some coral banded shrimp for company. Got a little bit of footage of it as well.





And the littlest juvenile box fish I've managed to get a shot of yet, although not as sharp as I'd have liked as it was moving around like a tasmanian devil on acid.


In and amongst the hard coral and soft sponges there were a good few bristleworms to be found wafting in the current.



And as usual the banded jawfish was in it's usual hiding place just by the 6 metre marker buoy. As I was getting a shot of this, there was a hogfish came shooting out from underneath the little ledge there. It wasn't swimming that great and I noticed that it had a couple of big chunks taken out of its trunk section.

About that time I checked about and saw the usual porcupine fish doing circles around the coral head nearby where it usually hangs out when I saw a barracuda dive straight down and try to take a chunk out of it. It didn't manage to get anything as the porcupine fish wasn't having any of it and the barra made a hasty retreat. It's always fascinating to watch nature in motion.